Category Archives: Attraction and Romance

True Love and Outer Space #excerpt #eroticromance #futuristic

When I wrote my eBook, Enslaved in Desire, I actually sat down to write another novel for a theme submission about pirates. (Space pirates to be exact.) Fortunately or unfortunately, I couldn’t complete that project in time for the submission deadline. Venn and Camryn wanted their story told.

Their story was something entirely different than the romances I had written and submitted before. Enslaved in Desire begins with the alien invasion of Earth and incorporates space travel, fight scenes, sex slaves, hot sex and true love.

Yes, I said true love. What is more “true” than settling differences of species, race, space and ideology just so you can be with the person who is your ONE? As in, one and only.

Here is Enslaved in Desire’s blurb followed by an excerpt to give you an idea of the types of *cough* tension filled moments that prompted Camryn and Venn to settle their differences and take the leap into love.

BLURB:

Camryn is taken captive after Earth is invaded by hostile aliens. She is sold as an exotic, an expensive sex slave. Camryn is willing to do anything to survive and escape captivity. That includes convincing her master that she enjoys his touch. Then she is purchased by the sexy warrior Venn. Now she must convince herself that she can resist a male whose every caress ignites a passion she has never known.

Venn is an empathic and hyper-sensitive tribal lord from planet Ordan. He has never owned a slave, yet he cannot resist the beautiful Earth woman. She teases his heightened senses and pushes past the control he has over his emotions. Venn struggles to own Camryn’s body with scorching sex and a firm hand. And when his possession of her body is complete, he’ll try to claim her soul.

EXCERPT

The following excerpt is for those readers who are 18 and over only.

Copyright © Stormie Kent, 2011

All Rights Reserved, Ellora’s Cave Publishing, Inc.

He crowded her back and she watched in the mirror. He was dressed for meetings in a black dress coat, crisp white shirt and fitted black pants. The contrast of her nude body pressed against his fully clothed form made her press back against him to feel the pleasure of the smooth material against her hot skin.

“I didn’t tell you to move, sweet.” He stepped back.

She groaned. Her eyes clashed with his in the mirror.

“What’s with the restraint?” she asked.

“I know you like it when I hold you down, but I wanted to use my hands today. And you did say it would take chains to keep you in one place,” he replied.

She remained as still as possible and he watched her for a while before moving behind her once more. She wanted to think she would resist him, but she couldn’t. When he got like this, he wasn’t going to be put off and she liked how he handled her too much. She liked that he took all the passion and barbarian in himself and locked it down, only for it to emerge again once he’d made her mindless. She knew it was there, just sitting under the surface of his skin. She could see it in the way his smile didn’t match the fire in his eyes.

He gathered her hair in one hand and wrapped it once around his hand. He pulled her head gently to the side. She curled her toes into the carpet so she wouldn’t move.

His other hand came up, but only one finger trailed her throat from her hairline to her shoulder. His mouth followed and his cool hair swung forward and trailed over her arm and breast. He did the same thing over and over again to the back of her neck and then transferred her hair to his other hand and worked the same magic on the other side of her neck. He tugged harder on her hair and the pleasure shot straight to her cunt.

He stepped beside her and leaned forward, raining kisses on her chin and neck. Then he turned her loose completely. She whimpered.

“Keep your eyes on your face and body in the mirror,” he said, lacing his voice with command.

She stared into his eyes in the mirror. Then she lowered her gaze to her own face. Her eyes were slumberous. Her bottom lip was swollen where she’d bitten it in concentration and she was flushed.

“Beautiful,” he said.

*****                                                   *****                                                   *****

Oh, boy. When I wrote about these two they became my obsession. What about you? What is your obsession? Do you write, sew, cook, run or some other activity that often makes you forget your purpose and good intentions? Leave a comment. I would love to hear from you.

Stormie

Stormie Talks Emotion:Fear

As writers, we are constantly trying to portray character emotions correctly. I’ve discussed romantic love and anger in previous posts. I want to explore fear today.

This is a reblog of a post I published on another blog. I hope you enjoy it.

What are the emotions that a human being may experience?

According to W. Gerrod Parrot (2001), there are six primary emotions (love, joy, surprise, anger, sadness and fear) which are then comprised of secondary and tertiary emotions. These secondary and tertiary emotions are more specific in scope. For example, the secondary emotions for fear are horror and nervousness. The tertiary emotions for fear/horror are shock, terror, panic, hysteria, alarm and mortification. All of these secondary and tertiary emotions stem from fear. (Click on the highlighted link for a chart.)

What are specific physiological responses associated with each major emotion?

Fear: It is one of the emotions people dislike, yet fear has kept our species alive. Fear, like other emotions, involves a biochemical response to an event, and our interpretation of it. Many of us have heard of the fight or flight response. When we perceive danger our bodies prepare to defend or run away. This reaction was crucial to our ancestor’s survival.

Fear shows up in the body through sweating, spiked adrenaline and amplified heart rate. Initially, we experience an event that is potentially physical dangerous or dangerous to our well-being. The amygdala is responsible for sending the message that we are frightened to our autonomic nervous system. The autonomic nervous system controls the body’s involuntary actions. It regulates heart rate, and allows the blood vessels to widen or narrow.

This is why our heart rate and blood pressure increase when we are scared. Our breathing quickens. Adrenaline and cortisol are released into our systems. Blood even flows away from the heart, and to our limbs, so that we can react more quickly to danger. Our ability to reason is impaired because the amygdala is sending the fear response to the autonomic nervous system. Many people have the feeling that time slows or feel as if everything is happening in slow motion. Our brains are trying to assess, and catalogue the possible danger we are facing.

Some people become addicted to the adrenaline high they get from their body’s biochemical reaction to fear. Who loves the giant drop on a roller coaster or a really good horror movie? Other people see the biochemical response to fear as something to be completely avoided. Phobias are an extension of this abhorrence of fear’s biochemical reactions, and how they feel in the body.

Now, what about your characters? If you read last week’s post on anger, you will notice the two emotions share some characteristics. Is this why when we are scared we can become violent? If your character is attacked by a vampire (not the nice, romantic kind) will they run or fight?

What scares you? What does fear feel like as it courses through your body? I would love to hear from you on the subject.

Stormie

Stormie Talks Emotion: Anger

This is part two of the emotions series.

As writers, we are constantly trying to portray character emotions correctly. In an attempt to do this, I’ve jumped into the world of human emotion. There are many theorists and theories. In the interest of time and word management, I’ve chosen the human emotion theory of Professor W. Gerrod Parrott, to start my journey.

This is a reblog of a post I wrote on another blog. I decided to share it here.

What are the emotions that a human being may experience?

According to W. Gerrod Parrot (2001), there are six primary emotions (love, joy, surprise, anger, sadness and fear) which are then comprised of secondary and tertiary emotions. These secondary and tertiary emotions are more specific in scope. For example, the secondary emotions for anger are irritation, exasperation, rage, disgust, envy and torment. The tertiary emotions for anger/rage are some emotions you might expect like anger, fury, and wrath. The tertiary emotions for anger/rage also contain more nuanced emotions like bitterness, scorn and resentment. All of these secondary and tertiary emotions stem from anger. (Click on the highlighted link for a chart.)

What are specific physiological responses associated with each major emotion?

The information I found focused on classifying emotions or the study of facial expressions. I will discuss anger today.

Anger: In response to an event, the amygdala in our brains initiated a fight or flight response in our bodies. Our interpretation helps determine the emotion.

I’m spunky character, A. My ex-husband confronts me in my office, and informs me that, in a hostile takeover, he now controls the company my great-great-grandfather built during the Reconstruction Era. What’s going on in my body?

According to Harry Mills, Ph.D., initially, anger will make my body tense. Then a rush of energy floods my system thanks to the neurotransmitter chemical catecholamine. I am ready to protect myself from any immediate danger. (Unless my ex is violent or enjoys tossing around paper-weights and staplers, this is unnecessary.)

While catecholamine is rushing through my system, my heart races, my blood pressure rises and I breathing becomes more rapid. Just in case I need to defend myself, blood enters my limbs, and causes my face to flush. My attention is totally focused on my nemesis. Let’s call him Evil Ex-husband.

By this time, the neurotransmitters and hormones, adrenaline and noradrenaline trigger arousal in my body. It causes me to remain angry with my ex for days, and probably fuels the actions that lead to great internal and external conflict.

What do I look like as I face down Evil Ex-husband? If I have a poker face, my features are smooth and blank. Unfortunately, I’m a hot-head. My eyebrows pull down and in, making a crease between them. My eyes narrow and lock onto Evil Ex-husband. My nostrils flair and my lips tighten. I square my body and ball up my fists.

In the seconds in takes all of these chemical and physical responses to happen, I can choose to completely loose it, and smack him or my prefrontal cortex (responsible for judgment) can inject a note of reason, and I can show him the door. Then, I can run for my lawyers.

What other physical reactions have you noticed go hand and hand with anger?

Stormie

Stormie Talks Emotion: Romantic Love

Character emotions are sometimes hard to get exactly right. Emotions and feelings can be subjective and culturally based. Even gender can determine how a character might respond emotionally to a comment or situation. Then there is the entire show the reader, don’t tell the reader portion of writing a story. As an author I thought it would be wise to do some research on human emotion. Mainly I wanted to understand 1) what are the emotions a human being may experience and 2) if there were specific physiological responses to certain emotions that were universal.

This is a reblog of a post I wrote for another website. I thought I would share it here.

What are the emotions that a human being may experience?

There is some scientific debate on the subject. Most theorists have a short list of what they call primary or basic emotions. Their lists can range from two emotions to eleven or more. These theorists believe that as we experience events we may combine one or two emotions to create emotions beyond basic joy and anger. For example, according to certain theorists, anger plus disgust equals contempt.

According to W. Gerrod Parrot (2001), there are six primary emotions (love, joy, surprise, anger, sadness and fear) which are then comprised of secondary and tertiary emotions. These secondary and tertiary emotions are more specific in scope. For example, the secondary emotions for love are affection, lust and longing. The tertiary emotions for love/lust include arousal, desire, lust, passion and infatuation. (Click on the highlighted link for a chart.)

What are specific physiological responses associated with each major emotion?

This is where the real research began. The information I found focused on classifying emotions or the study of facial expressions. I will discuss romantic love today.

Romantic Love: With emotion we realize that we are responding to stimuli – in this case – the object of our affection. We see and interact with someone and suddenly there is an attraction, longing, and maybe lust. We have assessed this person unconsciously through sight, sound, smell, touch and maybe taste if we are lucky. Our bodies, those wonderful machines, will begin to use those handy neurotransmitters adrenaline, serotonin, oxytocin, dopamine, vasopressin and testosterone to lure us in for a night or a lifetime.

But what does love feel like in our bodies? Initially, adrenaline, dopamine and serotonin take over and we may feel sweaty, light headed, and preoccupied with the other person. Our hearts race, our mouths may become dry when our love interest is near. We have too much energy and we can’t sleep. We may feel lust. We are deep in attraction.

Oxytocin and vasopressin take over if the bond is strong. We are urged to cherish and protect. These hormones keep the physiological effects we experienced in the attraction and lust phase going when we see our partner. After twenty years our heart still races, our eyes still dilate, we still want to touch. We think about our partner with worry and affection if we are away from each other too long. We are in love.

Well, at least our characters are in love. What other physical reactions have you noticed go hand and hand with romantic love?

Stormie

Can Your Sense Of Smell Lead You to Your Most Sexually Compatible Mate?

I will always associate Cool Water by Davidoff with good times with my ex. To this day, smelling the fragrance reminds me of our first “real date” fifteen years ago at the jazz and supper club, Blues Alley, in Washington, DC. Just what role does smell play in finding a partner? According to Ian Kerner, sexuality counselor, smell is an important component of emotions and attraction.

While researching this topic I came across the term major histocompatibility complex or MHC numerous times. The genes MHC are major role players in our immune systems. Studies to test how well we can detect MHC asked women to rate the natural (no artificial scents like cologne) smells of men’s t-shirts. The women consistently preferred the smell of men whose MHC was dissimilar from their own.

If the t-shirt had a similar MHC to theirs women considered the scent “brotherly” or “fatherly”. Women’s noses keep them from mating with these men. Sometimes.

Taking the birth control pill blocks a woman’s ability to discern which mate has the proper MHC for them. Why could this get dicey? Kerner claims that women who report having happier sex lives also say they love their man’s scent. Have you ever heard a friend say she suddenly can’t stand her partners smell? Ask her if she recently stopped taking birth control pills.

What about men? Apparently ovulating women produce pheromones called copulins. The copulins increase testosterone in men. Ah, testosterone. It’s a nice hormone that raises the libido of men and women. Chick a wow wow. (Sorry, I couldn’t resist.)

When we kiss and hug we are also employing our sense of smell. Do you hug without inhaling? That closeness also releases oxytocin and other neurotransmitters that leave us with a wonderful bonded and connected feeling.

In my book, Enslaved in Desire, Camryn is forced to live among hyper sensitive aliens for whom her unique, unadorned scent is an aphrodisiac. Clearly, the circumstances in Enslaved in Desire are fiction. I did not realize as I was writing it that humans have the unconscious ability to recognize compatible mates through their sense of smell.

You are a sexy mate detecting superstar, if you pay attention to who and what  please your sense of smell.

The information I read on smell and attraction mainly focused on F/M relationships but attraction is attraction. I’m sure F/F, M/M and any combinations of three or more F’s and M’s would have similar results.

Yes, I know other factors are involved in attraction and mate selection. Don’t rush me. I’ll get to those elements later.

So tell me, do you love your mate’s scent? Are you equally aroused by them freshly showered or sensuously sweaty? If you are in between relationships tell me what scents you find sexy. I’d love to hear from you.

Stormie